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Well-known philanthropist and businessman, Peet Viljoen, demonstrating his commitment to uplifting others.

Peet’s aim is lifting the spirit of our nation one step at a time, becoming more involved and contributing to a positive change in South Africa .

His Beliefs

give

Extending love and kindness

volunteer

Showing compassion

add

Making lives better

Peet chose his passion for the law and the justice system as his first career, enrolling at the University of Pretoria for a B.Proc. after his compulsory four years of military service. “I was only 16 when I started Matric, having started school so young, but even as a teenager I was resolute in my decision to one day practice law,” he says. “I finished studying in 1994, and the following year I was admitted as an attorney after completing my articles.

I put my heart and soul into being a lawyer, growing my practice to the point where I was representing the top people in the country. Part of me wanted to prove to my family that I could be the first one in our family to successfully graduate from university and pursue a professional career, and the other part was driven by my personal ambition and my passion for the law.”

After almost two decades of practising law, and gaining a reputation for one of the best lawyers in town, Peet’s law career hit a rough patch, culminating in his leaving the legal profession. “I learned a lot from that time in my life,” he says. “I thought I was resilient before – I learned to be tougher. I thought I was resourceful before – I learned to maximise the skills at my disposal. I took the challenge I was faced with to heart, and decided to reawaken my entrepreneurial spirit and become a businessman. I knew it was up to me to make the most of a tough situation – no one else was going to do it for me.”

Peet chose his passion for the law and the justice system as his first career, enrolling at the University of Pretoria for a B.Proc. after his compulsory four years of military service. “I was only 16 when I started Matric, having started school so young, but even as a teenager I was resolute in my decision to one day practice law,” he says. “I finished studying in 1994, and the following year I was admitted as an attorney after completing my articles.

I put my heart and soul into being a lawyer, growing my practice to the point where I was representing the top people in the country. Part of me wanted to prove to my family that I could be the first one in our family to successfully graduate from university and pursue a professional career, and the other part was driven by my personal ambition and my passion for the law.”

After almost two decades of practising law, and gaining a reputation for one of the best lawyers in town, Peet’s law career hit a rough patch, culminating in his leaving the legal profession. “I learned a lot from that time in my life,” he says. “I thought I was resilient before – I learned to be tougher. I thought I was resourceful before – I learned to maximise the skills at my disposal. I took the challenge I was faced with to heart, and decided to reawaken my entrepreneurial spirit and become a businessman. I knew it was up to me to make the most of a tough situation – no one else was going to do it for me.”

Peet chose his passion for the law and the justice system as his first career, enrolling at the University of Pretoria for a B.Proc. after his compulsory four years of military service. “I was only 16 when I started Matric, having started school so young, but even as a teenager I was resolute in my decision to one day practice law,” he says. “I finished studying in 1994, and the following year I was admitted as an attorney after completing my articles.

I put my heart and soul into being a lawyer, growing my practice to the point where I was representing the top people in the country. Part of me wanted to prove to my family that I could be the first one in our family to successfully graduate from university and pursue a professional career, and the other part was driven by my personal ambition and my passion for the law.”

After almost two decades of practising law, and gaining a reputation for one of the best lawyers in town, Peet’s law career hit a rough patch, culminating in his leaving the legal profession. “I learned a lot from that time in my life,” he says. “I thought I was resilient before – I learned to be tougher. I thought I was resourceful before – I learned to maximise the skills at my disposal. I took the challenge I was faced with to heart, and decided to reawaken my entrepreneurial spirit and become a businessman. I knew it was up to me to make the most of a tough situation – no one else was going to do it for me.”

Charity

Covid-19 Mask Distribution

Peet Viljoen donates over 1 000 reusable masks and hand sanitizers to essential workers

A Goal is a Dream
With a Deadline